Electric Installation Condition Report

What is an EICR?

An EICR is an Electrical Installation Condition Report. This is a formal document you will receive after the assessment of the electrical installation within a property. This will be produced by a qualified electrician or approved contractor. This will mean they will have already taken a course covering periodic inspection and testing and are registered with the JIB or a scheme provider such as the NICEIC plus who has a good working knowledge and experience of electrical installations.

Are EICRs Mandatory?

From 1 July 2020 you will be required to have an electrical inspection and a report on the condition of the property (EICR) performed by a qualified person. Renewals in this case include statutory periodic tenancies that are created at the end of a fixed term on or after this date.

For pre-existing tenancies, you will need to have an EICR performed on all existing tenancies before 1 April 2021.

There are many more reasons why you need to be done more often such as:

  • Age of the installation.
  • Environmental Conditions.
  • Vandalism of Electrical Installation.
  • Change in usage of the domestic premises. This could be change of occupancy in rental properties or the property is being purchased. It is highly recommended that an EICR is carried out with each change of occupancy in rental properties to ensure the property remains electrically safe. Equally, requesting an EICR on a property.

Does my property need an EICR?

With the regulations coming into force on 1 June 2020, they apply to new tenancies from 1 July 2020 and existing tenancies from 1 April 2021. The relevant date for determining when the new requirements apply is the date on which the tenancy is granted. A new tenancy is one that was granted on or after 1 June 2020.

  • If a private tenant has a right to occupy a property as their only or main residence and pays rent, then the Regulations apply. This includes assured shorthold tenancies and licences to occupy.
  • Exceptions are set out including social housing, lodgers, those on a long lease of 7 years or more, student halls of residence, hostels and refuges, care homes, hospitals and hospices, and other accommodation relating to healthcare provisions.

 

Do HMO need an EICR?

A house in multiple occupation (HMO) is a property rented out by at least 3 people who are not from one ‘household’ (for example a family) but share facilities like the bathroom and kitchen. If an HMO is a tenant’s only or main residence and they pay rent, then these Regulations apply to the HMO.

The Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation (England) Regulations 2006 previously put specific duties on landlords around electrical safety. This requirement has now been repealed, and HMOs are now covered by the new Electrical Safety Regulations.

HMOs with 5 or more tenants are licensable. The Housing Act 2004 has been amended by these Regulations to require a new mandatory condition in HMO licences ensuring that every electrical installation in the HMO is in proper working order and safe for continued use.

What is an EICR?

The inspection will find out if:

  • any electrical installations are overloaded
  • there are any potential electric shock risks and fire hazards
  • there is any defective electrical work
  • there is a lack of earthing or bonding – these are 2 ways of preventing electrical shocks that are built into electrical installations

 

what is a EICREICR reports

The electrical installation should be safe for continued use. In practice, if the report does not require investigative or remedial work, the landlord will not be required to carry out any further work.

Inspectors will use the following classification codes to indicate where a landlord must undertake remedial work.

  • Code 1 (C1): Danger present. Risk of injury.The electrical inspector may make any C1 hazards safe before leaving the property.
  • Code 2 (C2): Potentially dangerous.
  • Further Investigation (FI): Further investigation required without delay.
  • Code 3 (C3): Improvement recommended.Further remedial work is not required for the report to be deemed satisfactory.

 

If codes C1 or C2 are identified in on the report, then remedial work will be required. The report will state the installation is unsatisfactory for continued use.

If an inspector identifies that further investigative work is required (FI), the landlord must also ensure this is carried out.

The C3 classification code does not indicate remedial work is required, but only that improvement is recommended. Landlords don’t have to make the improvement, but it would improve the safety of the installation if they did.

If the report shows that remedial work or further investigation is required, as set out above, landlords must complete this work within 28 days or any shorter period if specified as necessary in the report. Landlords must then provide written confirmation that the work has been carried out to their tenant and to the local authority within 28 days. Local authorities may impose a financial penalty of up to £30,000 on landlords who are in breach of their duties.

Price for EICR

Bradwell Maintenance can provide an experienced qualified person to come and inspect your electrical installations in your household and supply you with your Electrical Installation Condition Report anywhere in the UK.

Call us today 0161 711 0997 or email us at info@bradwellmaintenance.co.uk for one of our team to advise on how we can help you.

 

 

 

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